MrsK's K-8 Books Worth Reading

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Thursday, July 12, 2018

God's Blessing Day by Day: Daily Devotional for Kids

God's Blessing Day By Day: MyDaily Devotional for Kids
Johnny Hunt, editor
ISBN: 9781400311306
Publisher's Synopsis:
One of the greatest gifts - and greatest challenges - of raising children is introducing them to the ways of God. As parents and grandparents, we want to impart our faith to the children we love so dearly, and it can feel more difficult than ever in the fast-moving, instant-access culture in which we find ourselves.

God’s Blessing Day by Day,compiled by Johnny Hunt and more than 50 pastors and church leaders, is the perfect way to build faith through gratitude.

This easy-to-understand, child-friendly devotional is the perfect way to engage your family. Each devotion is written on topics children care about and includes great prayers and takeaways that will spark conversation as the timeless Word of God instructs and inspires your children.

Impart a deeper connection with the Lord in your children, help them establish healthy habits of devotion and prayer, and equip them with the tools they need to grow their faith.

God is my Helper
PS 121:2
"Do you know that God loves to help you?
He's a good Helper to have because He can do anything!..."
(segment from Week10, Wednesday pg.58)
"Dear God, every day I need Your help for many things.
Thank You for helping." (prayer on pg.58)
"My God is big enough to help me with
any problem."
(memory banner on pg.58)
MrsK's Review:
Ok, so when this review package came, this mother... grandmother... teacher... librarian never made it down into my work station. The minute I opened the covers of this devotional, an excited request for the grandchildren went out into the front room. 

These devotionals are not just child friendly, the scripture passages and its teachings are so supportive for moments of discussion and sharing. The illustrations help smaller children look and listen (can you say cute, sweet, and tender).

The format is perfect for any day of the week that you choose to read, which in this reviewer's opinion is perfectly matched for the little one who might just be picking which devotional to read because of an illustration connection. Each devotion gives the author's name and city and state, which speaks volumes to children about the vastness of His faithful.


A must own for all young families and grandparents!
Gift this one... you will be passing on God's word by planting
seeds into our future generations,
MrsK
golden,star,christmas,favourite,bookmark
 "Exceptional!" MrsK

"It's good! It helps you know more about God. The pictures are really cute."
Riley Ella

"I wish I would have waited before I bought a different devotional.
This one makes understanding easier for kids from ages 4-9.
I like that it has a little prayer at the end,
plus a key phrase for them to memorize.
The illustrations just make it extra special!"
Brie (Riley and Gabriel's mom)
Tommy Nelson Mommy Program
Meet the Editor:
God’s Blessing Day by Day is a trustworthy devotional compiled by renowned pastors and church leaders. Edited by Johnny Hunt, former president of the Southern Baptist Convention, this devotional is the perfect way to introduce your children and grandchildren to a legacy of faith.

Tommy_General_logo_Color_HiRes
Thomas Nelson

Sunday, July 1, 2018

The Orphan's Wish by Melanie Dickerson

The Orphan's Wish (Hagenheim, #8)
ISBN: 978-0-7180-7483-8
Publisher's Synopsis:
From the streets to an orphanage in a faraway kingdom, Aladdin has grown up alone. Until he meets Kirstyn. With a father who is the duke of Hagenheim and a mother who is the patroness of the orphanage where Aladdin lives, Kirstyn is a member of the most powerful family in the land . . . and way out of his league. Despite the difference in their stations, Aladdin quickly becomes Kirstyn’s favorite companion for taking walks in the forest, and their childhood friendship grows along with them.

Through his scrappy skills, intelligence, and hard work, Aladdin earns a position serving in the duke’s house. But he knows it isn’t enough to grant him his one desire: Kirstyn’s hand in marriage. If he hopes to change his station in life and feel worthy of marrying Kirstyn, he must leave Hagenheim to seek his fortune.

But once Aladdin leaves, no one is around to protect Kirstyn, and the greedy men desperate to take advantage of her father’s wealth take notice. Now, more than Aladdin’s background stands in the way of the future he’s worked so hard to obtain. His only hope is to rescue Kirstyn and somehow manage to win her hand as well.

"You're a thief, and you'll never be anything but a thief."
MrsK's Review:
In 1401, Aladdin's life changes. Mustapha enters his life and appears to be a welcoming guardian. Right away Aladdin knew that Mustapha's ways were not what his mother would want for him. It took one kind hand, a small loaf of bread, and a promise about a place called Hagenheim to bring Aladdin "away from the bazaar and away from his Arab homeland."

For the past few years, Aladdin has been learning a new language, as well as the ways of a scribe at the Hagenhiem Cathedral. While on an outing to the Hagenheim Castle, Aladdin sees the "girl angel." His introduction to Lady Rose and her daughter Lady Kirstyn will once again change the path of his life. In all the he has learned, he recognizes that Hagenheim is a "safe place full of families who were kind to each other. And so, for now, his life would be centered around his daily learning, his walks with Lady Kirstyn, and becoming the best steward for the castle's orphanage.

Yet, by the time 1414 arrives, Aladdin awakened to the revelation that he would need to make a fortune for his future to become his reality. Although leaving Hagenhiem would bring a heaviness to the hearts of those who have given him a life beyond his imaginings, he had to fulfill his quest or he would never be able to ask for the hand of the one whom already held his heart. 

With Aladdin's decision to leave, Lady Kirstyn's heart would become burdened beyond the edge of its brokenness. The heaviness "...seemed to foretell evil happenings." How would she overcome the long separation from her dearest friend? Will it be possible for her to focus her attention on the needs of the orphans at Hagenhiem? Over time, would Aladdin even want to return to Hagenhiem or her? 

Aladdin's story-line weaves a reader's emotions in and out of bear attacks, jealous heirs, kidnappings, and killings. Those characters which will tug at your heart will know a victory that is priceless. Those characters of whom ill-got-gains is their "soul" focus will be held accountable. 

Melanie's "gifted" talent for re-telling our most beloved tales continues to enthrall, captivate, and endear her readers. These novels are crafted for the generations of readers beyond our place in time!
MrsK
"God, please let me asleep."
An adventurous quest... 
A spirited tale... 
An endearing ever-after victory...
Delightful!
Meet the Author:
  Melanie Dickerson  Melanie Dickerson is a New York Times bestselling author, a two-time Christy Award finalist, two-time Maggie Award winner, Carol Award winner, two-time winner of the Christian Retailing's Best award, and her book, The Healer's Apprentice, won the National Readers Choice Award for Best First Book. She is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) and Romance Writers of America (RWA). Melanie earned a bachelors degree in special education of the hearing impaired from The University of Alabama and has worked as a teacher in Georgia, Tennessee, and Ukraine. She lives with her husband and two children in Huntsville, Alabama.

Thomas Nelson

So many books to explore:

MrsK's to-read book montage

Heartbreak Creek
The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender
Each Little Bird that Sings
The Saturdays
Emily of Deep Valley
Roxaboxen


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MrsK's Reading Bio

Reading is important! No questions asked, not even a blink of the eye from any student I grew up with. On the first day of the First grade, we were given our first books. Day two we all read aloud, round robin of course. Day three we were place in our first basal, now known as a lit circle group. Books were so important, publishers designed new curriculum so that every student was reading by the end of the first week. These early readers had images that looked like what we could see in the classroom, beyond the classroom, even on the big screen. Reading is important, throughout history every generation has believed that “Reading” opens up the world for endless possibilities.

I adore the 1950’s Dick and Jane books. Actually, most reading specialists and experienced (45+) educators believe that every student learned to read with Dick and Jane. Since these books are being re-issued, I have heard many parents, grandparents, and students claim that Dick and Jane stories of repetition does teach students to read.

Early influences from my mother influenced my desire to read. I would watch her read and we would go on “secret” excursions to the library. The library became my playground. I owned every book I could carry home, of course they needed to be taken back to their home after visiting with me for a week or two. My first book that I could pull off of the library shelf and read was, Father Bear Comes Home. I only saw my dad on Sundays for a few hours. I would pull this beginning reader off of the library shelf every week. Every week I would try to read the first chapter. Every week I got further in the story. My mom would let me check it out, only if I could read it myself (She didn’t like the illustrations therefore she didn’t want to take time to read it to me). One day, I pulled the book from the shelf and when mom came to get me from the children’s corner, I realized that I had read the whole story. I ran to the check out desk and the Librarian KERCHUNKED the checkout card. My mother, brother and neighbors read. My teachers read. We all read aloud all day long in school. The Priest read aloud every day at mass, even in Latin. Everybody in the Doctor’s office read. People on the bus read. Dad’s waiting in their cars as the Mom’s and children grocery shopped, read. In fact, once you could read and write, Sunset Magazine considered you a reader and sent you mail every day.

Reading is important; I’ve spent my life reading. I’ve traveled around the world and into space through books. My favorite genre is whichever book I have open at the time. Children’s Literature is my passion. Book clubbing is one of the best past times, especially if food is involved. In fact my friends of old are in a book club and we are about to embark on a beach trip to “read” and discuss our newest selection.

My “home-run” book story has helped every student find his or her own “home-run” reads. Every year, I have shared my, Father Bear Comes Home, and every year my students have brought in their “home-run” books. That’s the “diving board” into our Lit. Studies.

In “Growing Up Digital,” Tapscott’s insights into the new generations enthusiasm for the Net reminded me of my generation’s enthusiasm for reading, movies, TV, parties and our driving permits. The Net-Generation, as Tapscott describes, “are learning, playing, communicating, working, creating communities, and enforcing a social transformation.”
N-Geners are interactive “techies” who are always looking for a way to “work it” verses the TV Generation of “Baby Boomers” who started out looking for “how it works.” Reading development is tougher today, society moves too fast to invest their “non-working” free time into a book or even “home work.” Since I stepped into my own classroom, I have seen students being told to read, being forced to read, and threatened into reading. Homework is not any longer the vehicle for students to gain their future lifestyles or careers with. Yet, the Internet does create an enthusiasm for learning. Since I have been enrolled in these courses, I have used the computers in every subject. My students are using the newest technology in the classroom because I am giving them investigative sites to use as they learn from each other and books. I agree with Tapscott, in order to bridge the gap with this up and coming generation we must “live and learn with them.”


FTC Required Disclaimer: I receive these books from the publishers. I did not receive monetary compensation for these reviews. These reviews have been posted in compliance with the FTC requirements set forth in the Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising (available at ftc.gov/os/2009/10/091005revisedendorsementguides.pdf)

2014

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